Get Worked Up: #TruthTella: Lessons Learned, Curtis Canham

Following is a brief summary of the presentations from Get Worked Up conference, September 22.
Part 8

#TruthTella: Lessons Learned
— Curtis Canham

Curtis Canham shared a few of the lessons he has learned during his career that can help out new designers (and even not so new designers) find a great job and avoid some common pitfalls.

About Getting Hired

Construct your portfolio around your unique strengths. Present projects that you would like to do more of. When presenting your portfolio, make sure to give your work context. Mock up a layout to show off an illustration for example.

Practical tip: Would you hire yourself? If you were hiring a designer, what specifically would you look for? Be that designer.

Design Philosophy

People seem to love bad design, and it is ok to give them that.

Another practical tip: Give your clients what they are asking for. You are providing a service. If you are hired to do a job, a brochure for example, just do the brochure. If the client’s logo is horrible, use it. You were hired to layout out a brochure.

Words of wisdom from Design Jesus, Dan Stiles.

Take Away: Know what makes you unique. Don’t be a dick. Be the designer you would hire. Do the job.

Twitter: @yayforaholes
Dribbble: CSA Creative, Curtis Canham
Website:CSA Creative*

Instagram: @yayforaholes

More presentations from Get Worked Up:

Mitch Goldstein, Start at the Start

Do It Anyway: Finding Opportunity in Unusual Places, Nicole Cooke

Do what you love, and you’ll still feel like you are working (sometimes), Sam Fuller

Vote Oswego Design strategy, Danielle Benincasa

Present Yourself, Milo Axelrod
Leading Creative Teams, Eleazar Hernandez 

Closing Remarks, Co-President Shauna Keating

 

More information about the AIGA Emerge program:  https://www.aiga.org/emerge

Upstate New York Twitter: @upstatenewyork
AIGA Emerge Twitter: #aigaemerge

By Andrea Duquette
Published September 29, 2018
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